Sunday, October 26, 2014

Quilts At The Library


I love visiting our local library in October for the annual quilt show.  Many of the quilts are new and several are very old, but they are all inspiring.  Whether it is the person who made them, hours of quiet stitching, or special fabrics, quilts hold special memories. 


I like my quilts to have special meaning whether it is the fabric I choose or a special design or color combination.  The quilt that I  cherish most was made years ago with scraps of fabrics from things that I made for my children.  Fabric from play clothes, nursery curtains, and a favorite Kindergarten dress are all included.  This quilt has a place of honor on the foot of my bed and every time a touch it I remember how much I loved being a mommy to little ones.

Michie'

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Mickey and Minnie

I was excited to be involved with the grand children's Halloween costumes again this year!  The mommies chose Mickey and Minnie Mouse and we divided out the sewing and party planning.  Since football season gives me a bit more time to sew on Saturday afternoons, I took care of  Minnie's dress.  Pattern #131 worked great with the only adjustment being a couple of inches added to the length of the yoke.  Mickey's shorts are being made using pattern #139 out of red broadcloth. 

Since Grandda's birthday is on Halloween and "Minnie" will turn 4 years old  a week later, they decided to share a party this year.  I am more than happy to do the sewing and leave the party planning to others.  :)

Michie'

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Nap Fabric


Nap fabrics have a definite surface texture and must be cut in one direction.  If the fabric is not cut correctly it will look like the garment has been made out of different color fabrics.  

Corduroys and velvets have a raised nap that you can feel by running your hand along the surface.  Rub your hand in one direction and it will feel like you are rubbing an animal's fur in the wrong direction.  Rub the fabric the other way and it will feel like you are stroking the animal in the right direction.  Just like stroking the animal from top to bottom, the fabric nap should run from the top of the garment down to the bottom.  Once the direction of the nap has been determined, the pattern pieces can then be laid out.  The example below shows the correct way to lay out pattern pieces with a nap.

Michie'

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Fall Sewing

I've pulled out corduroy, twills, and cotton prints and am frantically sewing for the grandchildren in anticipation of cooler weather.  Yes, I tend to wait until the last minute.  My excuse .... what if they grow some more?

Michie'

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Fabric Organization


I like to give my studio space a bit of cleaning and organizing at the beginning of each season.  I have taken the time over the last few weeks to tackle the fabric storage problem.  I have kept fabric folded on shelves or baskets for years, but find that some good pieces can get lost in the stack.  

I have been wanting to try the hanging file method for quite some time and am thrilled with the results.  Not only is it neat and tidy, I even found some fabric that I had forgotten about!  


There was just enough twill frog fabric for a jumper for my granddaughter.  Frogs just happens to be the theme of her classroom this year!

What you need

*A hanging file box 
*Hanging file folders (I cut the folder part off of the metal support)
*Neatly press each piece of fabric.  Not necessary!  Fold the fabric to the size of a hanging file and drape over the metal support.

I now have four boxes of neatly displayed fabric sitting neatly on the shelves.

Michie'

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Matching Plaids


I have always loved sewing with plaids.  Just a few things need to be kept in mind in order to have a successful sewing experience.  First of all, take a close look at the pattern of the fabric.  The way the fabric is pictured the white stripe is below the small blue stripe. Because of this, the top of all the pattern pieces should be going in the same direction.  This is called a one-directional plaid.


 
I like to prepare the pattern pieces using a ruler and marker and extending the grain line on the pattern piece.  Next, draw a line perpendicular to the grain line.   It does not matter at which point the lines intersect.  Pin the pattern piece to one layer of fabric and cut out.  Flip the pattern piece face down, lining up the marked lines as first piece and cut out. 
 
 
We are now ready to pin and sew.  Right sides together, carefully match the fabric stripes and pin through both layers.  Use plenty of pins and stitch the seam, occasionally peeking between the layers as you go along to make sure that the fabric isn't shifting.  You now have a plaid garment with matched plaids!
 
Michie'

Friday, August 29, 2014

Coming This Spring




Long or short pants with suspenders for the boys.  I have enjoyed testing the pattern using plaid suiting fabric that I found on sale.  Perfect for the boy who can't be still!

Michie'

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